Customer Retention: Would you like to know how increase customer retention during a sales call


Customer Retention:
Would you like to know how increase customer retention during a sales call

Retention 2
There are many ways to sell your product and service. Some are more effective than others. Frequently the sales training separates each portion of the sales gig into individual events. Then you are taught how to deal with the individual events piece by piece.

These separate events are classified as;
Greeting
Information gathering
Answering, beating back, by-passing objections
Closing the sale
Completing the work
Collecting payment

A lot of time training is spent discussing objections and closing the call. It is understandable why the concentration is spent on those 2 items. The objections stall the sale and you must know when to ask for the sale. Frequently the sales technician believes they have answered the objections and prematurely tries to close the call. This is when 3 things can occur. These 3 things are: the customer buys, the customer does not buy, customer buys and buyer’s remorse is created.

The problem with this type training is you create objections for the customer. The technician answers false objections and gives another objection to the customer to throw at them. The technician hears wow that price is high or other forms of what is presented as an objection and immediately thinks that needs answered. When in fact the customer made a statement that may not affect the sale and has no meaning.

Throwing some cute statement back at the customer does not answer any questions or concerns in relation to the reluctance or resistance the customer may exhibited. It may bring a smile or even a sigh out of the customer but it did not make an impact on the customer’s decision making process. Many buyers will buy when a price seems more than they thought. Buyers are conditioned to make statements that have absolutely no meaning. For proof of that statement re-visit some of the purchases you have made in the past and what you have stated to the sales clerk or sales person. Truth told almost anything is always more than you or I want to spend. However you or I end up purchasing the product for more than we thought than for less than we thought.

I had a concrete slab poured in my back yard for recreation purposes. When the concrete sales person told me I automatically stated that is a lot of money. Had the concrete guy known I was willing to spend 3 times that amount on cedar decking I would have been stuck at his price? Immediately he dropped his price 200 dollars due to me making a silly statement that meant absolutely nothing. He was taught to deal with objections immediately. It costs you money when you treat objections as a separate event of the buying process.

With traditional sales training in the construction trades you are taught to pounce on what you believe is a buying signal. What does a buying signal actually look like? Some believe it is when the customer makes a statement that is based in a fear of loss. In plumbing; a customer that has had a leak in the past under the floor that penetrates the top of the floor and then the customer states I did not like that and I am afraid it can happen again is a buying signal. The problem is the leak they are experiencing today is above the floor and contributed to a washing machine hose. This is when the sales person stops giving all the information and concentrates his or her efforts on never having this happen again to the customer. Is omission of information’s selling ethically or honestly? Selling a re-pipe is fine however you must sell ethically and give the customer all the information. You do this by asking the right questions and giving the right choices.

Closing is not a separate event and we must stop treating this as a separate event. This is exactly how customers become disenchanted with your company. When any company is more enthralled with making the most without consequences for your actions your reputation is targeted. By separating the closing and objections during the buying process you are fooling yourself with the customer’s real intent. The reason is you do not know the customers intent.

What if you were trained to not receive reluctance? What if you were trained to ask the right questions that gives you the customer’s reasons to move forward today? What if you were trained to look at the stuff a customer’s states from a different point of view that drastically alters the way you think? What if this different way of thinking produces a positive buying situation that is aligned to the customers reasons to get this taken care of today and by you?

What if you were trained to respond to the customer’s questions or concerns in a way that put you alongside of the customer. What if you were trained to hold a conversation and communicate to him or her on their level?

What would change if you understood where a customer was coming from? What difference would it make when you know the customer’s resistance and reluctance before you give your proposal? How much of a difference would it make if you can address the real issues and concerns the customer has with your product, service, and or price during your representation of your proposal? How much of a difference would it make when you can gain agreement with your proposal when you use the customer’s reasons to accept your proposal?
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The time is now to stop treating the sale as a separate event. It is not a separate event. It is 1 event where you gain agreement to a natural conclusion to use you. It is time to influence versus convince and persuade a customer into your way of thinking. It is up to you to discover and find your customer and then deliver what he or she requires. The time is now to increase retention and the interest of the customer. The time is now to stop boring your customer into submission.

Practice Better Business

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About practicebetterbusiness

Author of Outside the Business Box: All about Sales Build a better you and increase your earning potential

Posted on September 8, 2013, in communication skills, How to sell HVAC, How to sell plumbing, HVAC sales, plumbing sales, practicebetterbusiness.com, Selling HVAC, Selling Plumbing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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